Protelos approved for osteoporosis in men

Protelos (strontium ranelate) can now be used to treat osteoporosis in male patients at increased risk of fracture.

Strontium ranelate is currently licensed for postmenopausal osteoporosis to reduce the risk of vertebral and hip fractures | SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY
Strontium ranelate is currently licensed for postmenopausal osteoporosis to reduce the risk of vertebral and hip fractures | SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Two-year study

A 2-year, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the efficacy of strontium ranelate in 243 men with osteoporosis. In addition to strontium ranelate 2g daily, patients received daily supplements of calcium 1g and vitamin D 800iu. Significant increases in bone mineral density (BMD) versus placebo were observed as early as six months following initiation of strontium ranelate.

BMD increases similar to women

Over a 12-month period, strontium ranelate was associated with a considerable increase in mean lumbar spine BMD (5.32% [SE 0.75]; 95% CI 3.86–6.79; p<0.001) similar to that observed in the pivotal studies in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Significant increases were also observed in femoral neck and total hip BMD after 12 months.  

View Protelos drug record

Further information: Servier Laboratories Ltd

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