PPIs 'may improve glycaemic control' in diabetes patients

The potential glucose-lowering effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) should be considered when these drugs are prescribed to patients with diabetes, say researchers.

Proton pump inhibitors may improve blood sugar control in patients with diabetes.  | GETTY IMAGES
Proton pump inhibitors may improve blood sugar control in patients with diabetes. | GETTY IMAGES

PPIs improved blood glucose control in people with diabetes but did not reduce the risk of developing the condition, according to a new meta-analysis published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Researchers from the US and Taiwan evaluated the impact of PPI therapy on glycaemic control among people with diabetes and on the risk of new-onset diabetes among those without the condition. The meta-analysis included seven studies (n=342) examining glycaemic control and five studies (n=244,439) looking at risk of incident diabetes.

Compared with patients receiving standard care alone, the meta-analysis showed that patients receiving add-on PPI therapy had significant decreases in HbA1c and fasting blood glucose of 0.36 percentage points (p=0.025) and 10.0mg/dL (p=0.037), respectively. 

However, the researchers found no evidence that PPI use decreases the risk of developing new-onset diabetes. 

'People with diabetes should be aware that these commonly used antacid medications [PPIs] may improve their blood sugar control, and providers could consider this glucose-lowering effect when prescribing these medications to their patients,' said study author Kashif Munir, MD, associate professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, USA.

Last year, an analysis of three US studies suggested that regular use of PPIs could actually increase the risk of incident type II diabetes.

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