Detection of melanoma

This multicentre, prospective, blinded clinical study was conducted in the US and Europe to investigate the effectiveness and safety of the Nevisense system to distinguish benign lesions from melanoma

Researchers investigated the effectiveness of melanoma detection (Photograph: Lea Paterson/Science Photo Library)
Researchers investigated the effectiveness of melanoma detection (Photograph: Lea Paterson/Science Photo Library)
The Nevisense system uses electrical impedance spectroscopy for non-visual detection of malignant melanoma.

There were 1,951 participants in the study with a total of 2,416 lesions. Of these, 1,943 lesions were eligible to be included.

The study used Nevisense to examine all eligible skin lesions, which were also photographed, removed by biopsy and examined histopathologically. Clinical follow-up was conducted between four and 10 days after initial measurement.

The Nevisense system correctly predicted 256 of 265 confirmed melanomas, with a sensitivity of 96.6%. The positive and negative predictive value of Nevisense was found to be 21.1% and 98.2%, respectively.

It also correctly predicted all 55 confirmed non-melanoma skin cancer lesions (48 basal cell carcinoma and seven squamous cell carcinoma), with a sensitivity of 100%.

The researchers concluded that the Nevisense system is accurate and safe for clinicians to use as an aid in detecting cutaneous melanoma.

Malvehy J, Hauschild A, Curiel-Lewandrowski C et al. Br J Dermatol. Published online May 19, 2014. doi: 10.1111/bjd.13121

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