GP consultations for skin conditions

Skin conditions are the most frequent new reason for GP consultations in the UK, University of Nottingham researchers have found

Julia Schofield and colleagues examined surveillance data collected in the weekly returns service of the RCGP during 2006 and trends for subsequent years. The data covered a representative population of 950,000 people.

New episodes of skin disorders exceeded incidences of all other major disease groups. In total, 23% of the population consulted for a skin condition.

The researchers said the finding emphasised the need for appropriate education and training in dermatology of all medical students, and continuing education for primary care health professionals.
Schofield JK, Fleming D, Grindlay D et al. Br J Dermatol 2011; 165: 1044-50

Want news like this straight to your inbox?
Sign up for our bulletins

Read these next

The challenge of training to become a GPSI in dermatology

With this issue you will also find the MIMS Dermatology...

The role of the GP with a special interest in dermatology

The role of the GP with a special interest in dermatology

Training as a GPSI is an excellent way to experience...

New guidance on GP management of skin cancer

Guidelines now relate specifically to the management...


Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in

Register or Subscribe to MIMS

GPs can get MIMS print & online and GPonline for free when they register online – take 2 minutes, and make sure you get your free MIMS access! If you're not a GP, you can subscribe to MIMS for full access.

Register or subscribe

MIMS Dermatology

Read the latest issue online exclusively on MIMS Learning.

Read MIMS Dermatology

MIMS Adviser

Especially created for prescribing influencers.

Request free copy

Mobile apps

MIMS: access the full drug database and quick-reference tables on the go

MIMS Diagnosis and Management: concise information on signs and symptoms, investigations and diseases